Abstracts and biographies

A complete list of speakers’ abstracts can be found here: abstracts.

A complete list of biographical notes for speakers can be found here: bios.

Plenary speakers:

Kat Jungnickel – Friday 21st April, 10am

Abstract

Secret Cycling Selves: How Victorian women negotiated multiple mobile identities through patented cycle wear

Many Victorians enthusiastically took to the newest craze sweeping the nation in the 1890s – cycling. However, some bodies fitted more easily than others to this new exciting technology. Middle and upper class women’s clothing together with society’s ideas about feminine mobility norms and behaviours limited women’s freedom of movement. To cycle in ordinary fashion was dangerous, with layers of flapping materials catching in wheels and pedals. To cycle in more rational dress such as bloomers or knickerbockers was not necessarily safer, as onlookers unsettled by these ‘New Women’ carving out independent mobile identities in public space could hurl insults and rocks. Drawing on Feminist Science and Technology Studies and archival materials I explore how inventive Victorians responded to these socio-political and material challenges through their clothing, by designing and patenting radical new forms of cycle wear. These designs included convertible costumes, which enabled wearers to decide when and where to adapt their ordinary clothing into appropriate cycle wear and back again. Drawing on examples of patented designs I argue that these material interventions enabled women to resist social and physical limitations on their mobile bodies and identities. They made possible new ways women could negotiate relationships with technology and society.

Biography

Kat Jungnickel is a Senior Lecturer at Goldsmiths. She researches mobilities, technology practices and hacker/maker cultures through practice and inventive methods. Recently, she has been exploring what happens theoretically and methodologically when cycling, sewing and sociology collide in her research into the history of Victorian women’s cycling and radical forms of cycle wear.  She is the author of DiY WiFi: Re-imagining Connectivity (Palgrave Pivot) and the soon to be published The First Wheelwomen: Cycling, sewing and suffrage (Goldsmiths Press / MIT Press). www.katjungnickel.com @katjungnickel

 

Marian Aguiar  – Saturday 22nd April,  10am

Abstract

Drifting:  Agency, Mobility, and the Image of the Maritime Migrant

This talk proposes to use mobility studies to interpret the image of the drifting migrant in a series of related texts, a corpus that includes media features on refugees, maritime law, and the contemporary novel.  A mobility studies analysis may be used to think through, on the one hand, how in the mainstream media the aesthetics of movement function to support political strategies in the representation of contemporary refugees.  Such an analysis may also retrieve the ways literary and filmic texts rethink those constructions in sometimes disruptive ways.  While much of mobility studies focuses on what might be called “locomotion” that moves in a vector from place to place, such as the train, the automobile or the sailing ship, a subset of writing has investigated wandering, vagrancy and even stasis.  This talk thinks through such paradigms of non-vectored movement on the water, in the form of the drifting boat, as a way to a) understand alternate forms of mobility to locomotion b) recognize these kinds of movement, often produced out of crisis, structure the networks of globalization in ways that are more contingent than other kinds of flows, and thus worthy of study and c) retrieve the agency in such a seemingly passive condition.  Taking Yann Martel’s novel Life of Pi as a starting and ending point, this talk asks: what can a work of literature tell us about this paradigm of drifting and its politically saturated role in a global cultural imagination?   How might we use the paradigm of drifting to rethink the narration of movement, and in doing so reconsider assumptions about agency, freedom and mobility?

Biography

Marian Aguiar is an Associate Professor in the Literary and Cultural Studies Program in the Department of English at Carnegie Mellon University.  Her first book, Tracking Modernity: India, Trains, and the Culture of Mobility (University of Minnesota, 2011), explores cultural representations of modernity by considering how the railway was imagined in colonial, nationalist and postcolonial South Asian contexts. Her second book, Arranging Marriage: Conjugal Agency in the South Asian Diaspora (forthcoming University of Minnesota, 2018), rethinks conjugal narratives and practices as a dynamic part of contemporary globalization.  Aguiar teaches regularly on culture and globalization, postcolonial studies, gender studies, transnationalism and diaspora, and Anglophone global literature, especially South Asian literature.  She is currently researching a new book on refugee mobilities.

Andrew Kötting – Saturday 22nd April, 2.00-3.30pm

Andrew Kötting will present his new film, Edith Walks, and participate in a Q&A with audience.

Press Release

EDITH WALKS is a 60 minute 66 second feature film inspired by a walk from Waltham Abbey in Essex via Battle Abbey to St Leonards-on-Sea in East Sussex. The film documents a pilgrimage in memory of Edith Swan Neck.

The 108 mile journey, as the crow flies, allows the audience to reflect upon all things Edith. A conversation in Northampton between Alan Moore, Iain Sinclair and Edith Swan Neck is also a key element to the telling ‘story’.

With images shot using digital super 8 iphones and sound recorded using a specially constructed music box with a boom microphone, the film unfolds chronologically but in a completely unpredictable way. The numerous encounters and impromptu performances en route are proof, as if needed, that the angels of happenstance were looking upon EDITH as hallucination.

With David Aylward, Claudia Barton, Anonymous Bosch, Jem Finer, Andrew Kötting, Alan Moore and Iain Sinclair

“Who you walk with alters what you see, the view, the prospect ..”

Biography

Andrew Kötting was born in Elmstead Woods in 1959. After some early forays into market trading and scrap-metal dealing he travelled to Scandinavia to become a Lumberjack. He returned home in the 80’s to study for a BA Honours Degree in Fine Art at Ravensbourne College of Art and Design and then graduated with a Masters Degree from The Slade, University College, London. He currently lives and works between Hastings in England and Fougax-et-Barrineuf in the forests of the French Pyrenees. He teaches part-time at the University for the Creative Arts, Canterbury where he is Professor of Time Based Media. He has made numerous experimental short films, which were awarded prizes at several international film festivals. Gallivant (1996), was his first feature film, a road movie about his three-month journey around the coast of Britain, with his grandmother Gladys and his daughter Eden, which won the Channel 4 Prize at the Edinburgh Film Festival for Best Director and the Golden Ribbon Award in Rimini (Italy). The film went on in 2011 to be voted number 49 as Best British Film of all time by the UK publication Time Out. 2016 saw a 6 week retrospective of his films at Cinema Nova in Brussels, the release of two short animated films in collaboration with his daughter Eden and a multi media arts project Edith made with Iain Sinclair, Jem Finer, Claudia Barton, David Aylward and Anonymous Bosch.

 

Round Table Participants – Friday 21st, 8.00-9.30pm, Lancaster House Hotel

Marian Aguiar

Marian Aguiar is an Associate Professor in the Literary and Cultural Studies Program in the Department of English at Carnegie Mellon University.  Her first book, Tracking Modernity: India, Trains, and the Culture of Mobility (University of Minnesota, 2011), explores cultural representations of modernity by considering how the railway was imagined in colonial, nationalist and postcolonial South Asian contexts. Her second book, Arranging Marriage: Conjugal Agency in the South Asian Diaspora (forthcoming University of Minnesota, 2018), rethinks conjugal narratives and practices as a dynamic part of contemporary globalization.  Aguiar teaches regularly on culture and globalization, postcolonial studies, gender studies, transnationalism and diaspora, and Anglophone global literature, especially South Asian literature.  She is currently researching a new book on refugee mobilities.

Bruce Bennett

Bruce Bennett is Senior Lecturer in Film Studies in the Lancaster Institute for the Contemporary Arts at Lancaster University, UK. He is the author of The Cinema of Michael Winterbottom: Borders, Intimacy, Terror (Columbia University Press, 2014) and co-editor of the collections Teaching Transnational Cinema: Politics and Pedagogy (Routledge, 2016) and Cinema and Technology: Cultures, Theories, Practices (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008). He has published articles and book chapters on 3D cinema, Michael Bay, James Cameron and Hollywood blockbusters, economics and film theory, transnational film, the mediation of the global ‘war on terror’, and celebrity culture. He is currently co-editing a special issue of the journal Transnational Cinemas entitled ‘Aporias of Foreignness: Transnational Encounters in Cinema’, and is completing a historical study of the bicycle in cinema, Revolutionary Films: Cycling and Cinema (Goldsmiths Press, 2018).

 

Nick Dunn

Professor Nick Dunn is Executive Director of ImaginationLancaster, an open and exploratory design research lab at Lancaster University, where he is also Chair of Urban Design. He is Associate Director of the Institute for Social Futures, where he leads research in the Future of Cities and Urbanism. His work responds to the contemporary city as a series of systems, flows and processes, and is explored through experimentation and discourse addressing the nature of urban space: its perception, demarcation and appropriation. His most recent book, Dark Matters: A Manifesto for the Nocturnal City (Zero, 2016) is an exploration of walking as a cultural practice, the politics of space and the right to the city.

Ruth Livesey

Ruth Livesey is Reader in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Thought in the English Department of Royal Holloway, University of London. Her most recent book, Writing the Stage Coach Nation: Locality on the Move in Nineteenth-Century British Literature, appeared with OUP in 2016 and has been nominated for the MLA James Russell Lowell Prize 2017. Her interdisciplinary research continues to focus on mobility, place, and scale in the nineteenth century, with a new project focused on the idea of writing the local in the work of George Eliot. She was for many years an editor of Journal of Victorian Culture and now serves on the editorial board of Palgrave Studies in Mobility in Literature.

Charlotte Mathieson

Charlotte Mathieson is a Lecturer in Nineteenth-Century English Literature in the School of English and Languages at the University of Surrey. She researches nineteenth-century literature, with an interest in the intersections of gender, space and mobility in the novel. Her publications include Mobility in the Victorian Novel: Placing the Nation (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015) and Sea Narratives: Cultural Responses to the Sea, 1600-present (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016). She is Chair of the Feminist and Women’s Studies Association UK & Ireland, co-convenes the Transport and Mobility History Seminar at the Institute of Historical Research, London, and is co-editor of the series Palgrave Studies in Mobilities, Literature and Culture (http://www: springer.com/series/15385).

Peter Merriman

Peter Merriman is Professor of Human Geography at Aberystwyth University, Wales. His research focuses on histories and geographies of mobility, with a particular focus on the spaces and practices of driving in Britain. Peter has authored/edited 5 books, including: Mobility, Space and Culture (2012, Routledge), Driving Spaces (2007, Blackwell), Geographies of Mobilities (co-edited 2011, Ashgate), and The Routledge Handbook of Mobilities (co-edited 2014). He is a senior editor of Transfers: Interdisciplinary Journal of Mobility Studies, Reviews Editor of Cultural Geographies, and serves on the editorial boards of Mobilities and Applied Mobilities. He is currently writing a book on theoretical approaches to space and undertaking research on the early histories of driving in Britain.

Lynne Pearce

Lynne Pearce is Professor of Literary and Cultural Theory in the English Department at Lancaster University (UK) where she has worked for over 25 years. Her early work focused of feminist theory and romance, but she has since undergone her own ‘mobilities turn’ through her involvement in projects on regional and diasporic writing in the British Isles (including the AHRC-funded Moving Manchester, 2006-10) and her research on automobility (see Drivetime: Literary Excursions in Automotive Consciousness, 2016). She is currently Director for the Humanities at Lancaster’s Centre for Mobilities Research [CeMoRe] and co-editor of the new book series Palgrave Studies in Mobilities, Literature and Culture (see http://www: springer.com/series/15385).